Tag Archives: BitTorrent

The awesomeness of Miro

The awesomeness of Miro

Miro is the awesome successor to the Democracy TV player. It’s open source and supports open content. It’s being developed by the Participatory Culture Foundation, whose president, NAME, was recently interviewed at Groklaw.

Reville had this to say about DRM:

[Miro is] not [compatible with DRM], and we don’t support DRM. We think it’s a terrible technology for consumers. We think it’s terrible for the public. It restricts people’s free speech and copyright rights in a whole number of ways. And what’s really going to turn the tide … is that major media companies, like the major record labels, are realizing that when they put DRM on the media that they’re trying to sell, they sell less of it. … I think the television, movie and other video companies … will eventually realize that they’re limiting their own sales, and they’re not preventing any kind of unauthorized distribution by putting DRM onto their media.

… and followed it up with these comments on net neutrality and the impact on lawful activities of ISPs being pushed into network filtering or other non-neutral practices:

We think that net neutrality is vital to the health of the Internet and our hope is that, in the United States and globally, that that will become part of the law for ISPs, and there’s candidates like Barack Obama that have come out really clearly supporting that neutrality. As soon as you get into things like filtering, restricting what type of technologies people can use to share information, you’re going to start locking out speech, and you’re going to start shutting down important ways that people are talking to each other.

Miro, for instance, supports BitTorrent, which is known I think among most people as an unauthorized file sharing platform. But the way Miro uses it is people connect to channels in the Miro guide that are video offered by the publisher in BitTorrent format because it lets them deliver very high [quality] video at very, very low cost. And so you have channels like Democracy Now, for instance, that uses BitTorrent to distribute multi hundreds of megabyte video files every day, and instead of incurring massive bandwidth costs, they’re able to use BitTorrent to keep that price way down. Once you start restricting BitTorrent at the ISP level, that means that organizations like Democracy Now are no longer able to get that message out. It’s just that simple. …

(linked from Thomas Gideon at Open Media Review, 2/26)

Nine Inch Nails offers CD downloads for remix

Machinist at Salon has the scoop. Yaay Nine Inch Nails! It’s been a while since I’ve broken out my NIN collection but this inspires me to dip back in.

It’s not just a web download, either; there’s a torrent at PirateBay.

Wow, this sort of means that NIN is to BitTorrent was Mr. Rogers was to the VCR. Heh.

people take this IP stuff so seriously

An English IT firm fired a consultant after he commented on Grokster on BBC, and the firm had this to say:

“The decision to terminate his employment was made in order to defend our legitimate business interests. Mr Hanff has declared that he is opposed to copyright and intellectual property laws. Since much of our business is based around the protection of our copyright and intellectual property, we consider our dismissal of Mr Hanff entirely justified and appropriate.”

Techie fired over Grokster comments on BBC [silicon.com]

If the company fired him because he was using their resources to host his bittorrent site, that would be one thing. The article mentions that the MPAA is suing him for hosting a bittorrent site. But no, it appears from the company’s statement that it fired him for his “opposition to copyright and intellectual property laws”.

Based on this statement, it appears that Aldcliffe Computer Systems in Lancaster is “defend[ing] [its] legitimate business interests” by enforcing a thought code. That doesn’t sound like good business practice to me. The company is crafting a workforce of orthodox thinkers and yes-men. Who would want to work for a company that requires its employees to shape their personal beliefs in accord with whatever internal policies are being crafted that week?

Employers have successfully infiltrated the private lives of workers by requiring drug tests and monitoring email. But Aldcliffe Computer Systems thinks employers should also be able to colonize their minds.

I feel a science fiction story coming on …