Category Archives: open content

amidst a long dark hiatus of the blog, THIS

THIS. Glenn Greenwald on “The media’s authoritarianism and WikiLeaks”. Please note Greenwald’s excoriation of the widespread misstatement about what WikiLeaks has actually done: WikiLeaks has only posted 1269 of the 250,000 cables they possess. They have not “posted” or “published” all of them; they have not “dumped” them. They have published a very small, screened selection of the cables; and then provided copies of the entire set to media organizations. It’s just infuriating that almost nobody in the media gets this right.

And, for good measure, THIS, “a brief history of Operation Payback”.

Nine Inch Nails offers CD downloads for remix

Machinist at Salon has the scoop. Yaay Nine Inch Nails! It’s been a while since I’ve broken out my NIN collection but this inspires me to dip back in.

It’s not just a web download, either; there’s a torrent at PirateBay.

Wow, this sort of means that NIN is to BitTorrent was Mr. Rogers was to the VCR. Heh.

carl malamud, freeing the law

Go Carl Malamud, freeing the law! The same Carl Malamud that pushed SEC’s EDGAR database to be open has now published 1.8 million United States court opinions. The project was announced in November, and just three months later, it’s online.

The opinions are at Malamud’s main website, resource.org, and there is now a special website for the court opinions: http://bulk.resource.org/courts.gov/ .

More info:

tentative toe blogging: Harvard approves open access

I’ll be watching Harvard’s A&S faculty vote today to see if they approve setting up a library-run faculty publications open access repository. (A proposal, I noted to my partner, that I first saw some 15 years ago in the library community.) The NYT covered the proposal.

For-profit scholarly publishers have of course been complaining vociferously about the trend toward scholars’ and faculty’s open access archives; scholarly societies less so. The for-profit scholarly publishers are in the same position as the recording industry: A set of middlemen that has profited from a technology that, for two centuries, made their business model profitable and even, in some cases, a virtual monopoly. Now that technology has moved on they feel insulted, as if they have a “god”-given right to their particular business model.

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update 10pm: Yaay! It passed. See Chronicle of Higher Ed which says it passed, and see Harvard Crimson for details about the proposal. More info at inside higher ed.