Archive for October, 2006
it’s not FCC “fair use”

(It’s the anthem for fccfu.com … and, relatedly, you all know about Eric Idle’s ‘The FCC Song’, right?)

Boys read boys, NYT Editorial Board edition
string of author photos at NYT MidtermMadness blog

Good going, NYT — on their new “http://midtermmadness.blogs.nytimes.com/”, which offers an array of commentators, professors, and pundits to comment on the 2006 elections … they’ve given us six (6) men, all apparently white, and dare I guess their class backgrounds? Way to seek a diversity of opinion.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Requiem for habeas corpus

Sometimes one despairs and relies on others to speak truth to power. Many have done so with respect to with respect to the “Military Commissions Act of 2006″, but Kent Keith Olbermann‘s was particularly eloquent.

update: Ahem. Apparently that’s Keith Olbermann, and Kent Brockman. Another sign of aging, because I would never ordinarily confuse the grey/blonde Simpson’s reporter with the grey/blonde MSNBC reporter.

good fair use news for collage artists

A great decision from the 2d Circuit in another case about Jeff Koons. Collage artists haven’t had a lot of caselaw to work with before Blanch v. Koons, and it’s reassuring to get a positive spin on transformative artistic uses. More analysis coming.

getting my atheist on

Last week, I was told that I have a “god-shaped hole in my heart.” … I think I’d prefer to phrase it as he has a god-shaped figment jammed crosswise in his brain.

P.Z. Myers, Pharyngula, 2006/10/27, “A godless ramble against the ditherings of theologians

The last couple of years I’ve been pleased to see an outbreak of out-and-out criticism of religion, not just for the bad things religious folks do in the name of religion, but for the silliness and harmfulness of religion itself.

For me, the charge has been led by Richard Dawkins (most recently, The God Delusion), Sam Harris (The End of Faith), and P.Z. Myers (Pharyngula). Dawkins, Harris and Myers aren’t truly leading a charge; they’re surfing the zeitgeist. A lot of folks are ticked off about religion, but until lately, one would rarely hear us talk about it. Despite the stereotype of the proselytizing atheist, most of us don’t bother. (If only the religious folks of the world would just stop flaunting their lifestyle.)

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NJ SSM decision

The NJ Supreme Court is releasing its SSM decision today @ 3pm. [available at NJSC website]

Will they help us out but energize the Republicans and lead to queers being blamed if the Dems don’t take the House or Senate? or will they fuck us over leaving everyone, but us, happy?

(And if I’m writing to a general audience comprised mostly of non-queers, should I really use the pronoun “us”? I’m doing it anyway—learn to read as The Other.)

update: A winnah!

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reflections on the demise of Tower Records

“We’re going to have discounts for consumers to enjoy as they’ve never been seen before in the history of Tower Records,” said Andy Gumaer, president of Great American Group, a Los Angeles-based firm that won the auction …. [LAT 10/7]

Yeah, right.

Last night I stopped by Tower Records to see if I could pick up any deals at their going-out-of-business sale. Yow. No wonder they’re going out of business, when their average CD still costs $18-$20. Take 20% off of something that is 50% overpriced to begin with and, let’s see, do the math — it’s still really overpriced.

I know I signed up for that class action settlement on overpriced CDs (and I never got my check for that, by the way, which would have been a vast underpayment for my ~ 1000 CD collection, no small portion of which was purchased at Tower Records … but it would have briefly afforded me some moral feel-goodness). So what happened? Shouldn’t that have done something to get the prices to something approaching rationality? But no, I guess after the settlement the record companies paid attorney’s fees and shipped multiple copies of the same overstock crap albums to libraries and schools … and then everyone continued merrily on overpricing CDs.

Of course, Tower blamed it on illegal filesharing. “Can’t compete with free.” No, Tower couldn’t compete with reasonably priced. Amazon.com is cheaper even with shipping costs, and iTunes offers 12-track albums for $11.88 on a per-track basis or just skip the tracks you don’t like.

But Tower didn’t have to out-compete Amazon.com and iTunes. Most folks don’t mind paying some kind of premium for brick-and-mortar, which gives you an actual place to go for retail therapy or as part of a date, offers physical browsing and interacting with other people … So a reasonable premium might be, what, 10, 20%? Not the $18 CD. In this market, it’s amazing Tower has lasted as long as it has.

… The LAT (10/22) nicely summed up the goods and bads of this. After driving out all the local record stores with predatory pricing and economies of scale, Tower increased its own prices and proceeded to mismanage itself into bankruptcy. But it was a good record store in terms of selection. So Tower’s demise leaves us with sucky chain record stores and the big-box retailers who “out-chained” Tower and sell only “the hits” — a market that is obviously dwindling.

And the other thing I couldn’t help but notice as I wandered through the vast aisles of youth-oriented crap: There are vast aisles of youth-oriented crap. So what marketing geniuses decided to target the 15-20-yo boy market? Who decides, hey, let’s pick a small age group (a scant 3.4% of the population [US Census Bureau / 2005]) without a very high income, and make them our target demographic? … and the music & movie industries complain about filesharing. Geez.

Who doesn’t care about political hypocrisy

Joe Conason at Salon explains why the leaders of the religious right don’t care that Republican Christian nationalists are hypocrites, and predicts that they’ll be ba-a-ack:

The leaders of the religious right don’t care whether White House hacks love them or laugh at them, because they see themselves as the users, not the used. Winning power in the Republican Party represents the work of more than two decades for Robertson, Falwell, Dobson, their ultraright comrades and the new leaders, such as Tony Perkins and Rod Parsley, who will eventually succeed them. Their radical goal is an America under the dominion of men like themselves, and the Republican Party will continue to be the most plausible vehicle for their movement. They may lose ground this year — but they will most certainly be back with renewed determination in 2008.