Monthly Archives: March 2005

peculiar dress habits of old white men

Old white men meeting to discuss US intelligence “failures” on Iraq weapons — notice the uniformity of dark suits? Ah, but look at the rainbow of ties! Peeking out beneath the boring suits are a springtime explosion of color, patterns — perhaps even delirious textures. These men crave to express their individuality but are bound by convention, and, perhaps, a fear of their own exuberant natures. But they can’t resist the call of fashion forever — look, some of them have begun to don modest little brooches, hoping the small size will render them unnoticed but unable to resist the lure of jewelry. We can’t see their socks or boxers — indeed I’m happy not to — but I wouldn’t be surprised if there were some silk or fun colors there. What these boys need is liberation — a gay liberation!

Now look at these old white men meeting to discuss, well, gay liberation. Again, virtually all in somber hues. But their inner fashionista peeks out through their shiny gold brocade, frankly gaudy jewelry, and funny hats — one even in pink! Personally, I think these boys would do better to look to their own selves instead of plucking motes out of the eyes of their local glbt community. Some of these boys are definitely wearing dresses, which is covered by Deut. 22:5, “A woman shall not wear anything that pertains to a man, nor shall a man put on a woman’s garment; for whoever does these things is an abomination to the LORD your God.” I hope they’re watching out for those blended fabrics, too — those’ll get you in trouble.[1] [Bible, Revised Standard, from the University of Virginia Library, Electronic Text Center])

photo credits: bottom, European Pressphoto Agency, published in NYT 3/31, Laurie Goodstein and Greg Myre, “Clerics Fighting a Gay Festival for Jerusalem”

top, Brendan Smialowsky/Agence France-Press — Getty Images, published in NYT 3/31, David Stout, “Report Calls U.S. Intelligence ‘Dead Wrong’ on Iraq Weapons”


1. I’ve been reminded that some folks do observe the traditional injunctions against various mixed fabrics. Them, I’ll cut some slack (no pun intended) for being consistent, although, of course, still reserving the right to critique their behavior (and fashion sense) as I please on other grounds. But I truly don’t ever want to hear another self-proclaimed Biblical literalist / conservative quoting anti-man-lying-with-another-man scripture unless they cut out the blended fabrics, drop dollars in favor of shekels, and go back and figure out what it would mean to actually consistently follow Deut., Leviticus, etc. — LQ 4/28

doubletake: did he say that?

And the Republican abandonment of ‘federalism’ continues:

Senator Tom Coburn, a newly elected conservative Republican from Oklahoma, said: “This isn’t a states’ rights issue. What we’re saying is they are going to review it. The states are not given the right to take away somebody’s constitutional rights.”

[House majority leader Tom Delay]: “The conservative doctrine here is the Constitution of the United States.”

These and many other astonishing quotes are courtesy of the Terri Schiavo case — the latest mad rush by Republicans to abandon their much-vaunted dedication to federalism and states’ rights. [Chronicled here by the Adam Nagourney of the NYT [2005/3/25].] As predicted, Republicans like pretty much everyone else happily use the power they’ve got — full-on federal government power.

anti-racist protest also stings anti-bootleggers

While protesting the airing of “The Tsunami Song”, Asian-American rapper Cobra took shots at the anti-bootlegging “whiners”:

Though promoted as an antiracist event, the rally lamented the degraded state of the corporate music industry generally. One of the first performances at the demonstration came from Asian-American rapper Cobra. In front of an audience holding signs reading “Hot 97 Divides Our Community,” “Stop Hate 97″ and “I Am Hip-Hop,” Cobra recited lyrics that earnestly expressed his grievances with the state of hip-hop: “With a hot producer/Hitler would still be popular, blinged-out with Medusa [a popular jewelry brand].” In another song, he castigated greedy artists who fail to recognize the boost in visibility they get from bootlegs and online music traders: “Now you mad ’cause your bootleg’s on the Ave.?/That’s the best promotion team that you’ve ever had!…/You whiners unnerve me/You’re just an old, white exec in a throwback jersey.”

Rap News Network – Hip-Hop Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

Hirsch seems confused about the point of documentary interviews

The documentary film weblog reports that an attorney who was interviewed for “Super Size Me” is now suing on defamation etc. for using his filmed quotes in the film.

… shall I risk re-publisher liability for quoting the allegedly defamatory statements? Yes, I’m feeling willful today (or perhaps just very very dubious about the likelihood of success on the merits of this litigation): According to the NY Observer March 13 article,

In his only appearance on camera, Mr. Spurlock asks Mr. Hirsch about his motivation for being involved in the McDonald’s litigation. Mr. Hirsch’s reply? “You mean, motive besides monetary compensation?” He then added, “You want to hear a noble cause?”

Dude. You were being filmed for a documentary. You didn’t think that the footage might actually get used? … I don’t think that this sort of lawsuit is going to make people look more charitably on the underlying McDonald’s-contributes-to-obesity lawsuit.

… and the criminalization of copyright law continues

great:

A federal task force that monitors the Internet caught on to the student and got a warrant

I also love how all these cases have some quote from the RIAA about how much money they lose each year. Unverifiable Saganesque billions and billions…

Teen Convicted Under Internet Piracy Law

By BETH DeFALCO
Associated Press Writer

AP Mar 7, 10:22 PM EST

PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona university student is believed to be the first person in the country to be convicted of a crime under state laws for illegally downloading music and movies from the Internet, prosecutors and activists say.

University of Arizona student Parvin Dhaliwal pleaded guilty to possession of counterfeit marks, or unauthorized copies of intellectual property.

Under an agreement with prosecutors, Dhaliwal was sentenced last month to a three-month deferred jail sentence, three years of probation, 200 hours of community service and a $5,400 fine. The judge in the case also ordered him to take a copyright class at the University of Arizona, which he attends, and to avoid file-sharing computer programs.

“Generally copyright is exclusively a federal matter,” said Jason Schultz, an attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a technology civil liberties group. “Up until this point, you just haven’t seen states involved at all.”

Federal investigators referred the case to the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office for prosecution because Dhaliwal was a minor when he committed the crime, said Krystal Garza, a spokeswoman for the office.

“His age was a big factor,” she said. “If it went into federal court, it’s a minimum of three months in jail up front.”

Although Dhaliwal wasn’t charged until he was 18, he was 17 when he committed the crime. Prosecutors charged him as an adult but kept it in state court to allow for a deferred sentence. Garza also said Dhaliwal had no prior criminal record.

The charge is a low-level felony but may be dropped to a misdemeanor once he completes probation, she said.

A call to Dhaliwal’s attorney, James Martin, was not returned.

A man who identified himself as Dhaliwal’s father, but refused to give his name, returned a message left Monday at Dhaliwal’s parents’ home. He said his son had made a mistake, and was trying to put the case behind him. The man declined to comment further.

Brad Buckles, executive vice president for anti-piracy at the Recording Industry Association of America, said estimates say Internet piracy has cost the industry up to $300 million a year in CD sales alone.

The FBI found illegal copies of music and movies on Dhaliwal’s computer, including films that, at the time of the theft, were available only in theaters. They included “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,” “Matrix Revolutions,” “The Cat In The Hat,” and “Mona Lisa Smile.”

A federal task force that monitors the Internet caught on to the student and got a warrant, Garza said, adding that Dhaliwal was copying and selling the pirated material.

Teen Convicted Under Internet Piracy Law

florida high school yearbook insanity

This is at least the second such story out of Florida in the last couple of years. This year — 2005, not 1955 — high school principal Sam Ward at Fleming Island High School in Clay County, Florida, has decided that the high school yearbook will not publish the photo of a senior young woman who had her picture taken in a “tuxedo” top instead of a “drape” top.

The mind boggles at this guy’s stupidity. How is he 50 years behind? Why on earth are the students not rising up in protest? This kind of idiocy from adults, and apathy / “good soldier” behavior from students is why I will never, ever live in the South again.